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Banishers Ghosts of New Eden Review: Love and Sacrifice Redefined

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Banishers: Ghosts of New Eden” throws players into a ghostly action-adventure that pushes the boundaries of narrative within video games. Developed by the acclaimed studio Don’t Nod, known for their narrative-driven titles, “Banishers” invites players to the haunted shores of New Eden, a realm where life and death blur in the moonlight.

At the heart of New Eden’s ghostly saga are Red and Antea, lovers ensnared in a tragic fate. Antea, now a specter herself, battles the irony of hunting her own kind alongside Red, as they navigate the moral labyrinth of resurrecting the dead at the cost of the living. The game ingeniously allows players to swap between Red and Antea, each choice laden with consequence, as they pledge to ascend souls or sacrifice the living for their own ends. This moral complexity enriches the narrative, challenging players to delve into the psyches of New Eden’s inhabitants and uncover the stories tethering spirits to the mortal realm.

The gameplay mechanics reflect this duality, blending combat and exploration with a deep narrative. Antea’s spectral abilities to glimpse into the past and unveil hidden trails contrast with the more tangible, combative prowess of Red, highlighting a synergy between the characters that extends beyond their personal bond to their complementary fighting styles. Antea specializes in crowd control and area-of-effect spells, while Red excels in physical combat, each enhancing the other’s capabilities and allowing for fluid switches between characters to maintain energy and health levels.

The haunting cases players encounter are as varied as they are morally ambiguous, touching on themes of jealousy, war, slavery, and forbidden love. Each resolved haunting impacts the world of New Eden, reflecting the game’s nuanced approach to storytelling where your actions visibly affect the environment and its people. This dynamic not only adds depth to the gameplay but also to the narrative, enriching the player’s engagement with the world and its characters.

Despite its ambitious narrative and innovative gameplay, “Banishers” does not escape criticism. The process of gathering clues and solving the mysteries behind each haunting, while engaging, sometimes falls into a pattern of finding highlighted objects rather than encouraging genuine detective work. Moreover, while the combat system shows significant improvement from Don’t Nod’s previous works, it might not satisfy those seeking a more challenging or intricate fighting experience.

Yet, it’s the story of Red and Antea, underscored by performances from Amaka Okafor and Russ Bain, that anchors “Banishers” in a reality brimming with emotional depth. The game masterfully explores themes of promises kept and broken, weaving them into the fabric of its world and the personal saga of its protagonists. The narrative’s focus on love’s power—both its beauty and its potential for tragedy—renders “Banishers” a compelling experience that might leave players reflecting on their own moral compasses.

See also  Hatchet.  Bury it.

“Banishers: Ghosts of New Eden” thus stands out due to the storytelling prowess of Don’t Nod, offering a rich, emotionally charged journey that melds action, adventure, and narrative depth into a memorable experience. While not without its flaws, the game marks a significant step forward for the studio, hinting at the untapped potential for future titles in this vein. It’s a journey worth taking, not just for the thrills and challenges, but for the questions it poses about love, sacrifice, and the afterlife.

RATING: 4.0 out of 5.0.

Banishers: Ghosts of New Eden is available for PC, PlayStation 5, and Xbox Series S/X.

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  • Luis

    Wish I could watch these movies everyone else gets to see but I'm too busy playing games 24/7. Thanks Dad for the trust fund!

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1 Response

  1. the flying mouse says:

    the whole love and sacrifice theme was so well done. The only thing I didn’t like was the endin, felt a bit rushed.

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